New York Times features PSI’s forensic stormwater research

New York Times features PSI’s forensic stormwater research

Workers for the Center for Urban Waters examining a storm-water outlet in Tacoma, Wash., as part of pollution monitoring. Credit Matthew Ryan Williams for The New York Times
Workers for the Center for Urban Waters examining a storm-water outlet in Tacoma, Wash., as part of pollution monitoring. Credit Matthew Ryan Williams for The New York Times

A June 12th article in The New York Times features a collaboration between the Puget Sound Institute and the City of Tacoma to curb stormwater pollution.
PSI’s Director Joel Baker describes how “the forensic work of the scientists and the city have changed the ability to enforce antipollution laws.”
Scientists at PSI and the Center for Urban Waters have been working closely with the City of Tacoma to identify and trace sources of contaminants from stormwater and underground pipes flowing into Puget Sound.
“We talk about being able to go to anyone — an individual, a house, a business — who is discharging something,” Dr. Baker told the Times, “and unambiguously trace back to them. That gets you into a whole different conversation with people about responsibilities and remedies.”
The article reports that 85% of all water pollution now comes from stormwater and runoff from agriculture.
Read the full article.